Father of accused Rockville rapist detained by immigration authorities

Father of accused Rockville rapist detained by immigration authorities

Federal immigration agents have detained the father of the 18-year-old Guatemalan, who is accused of violently raping a high school classmate in Rockville, Maryland, for being in the US illegally. The Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) confirmed on Monday that Adolfo Sanchez-Reyes, 43, was arrested on Friday at his home in Rockville, “after a review of his immigration history revealed he was unlawfully present in the United States.”

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“He was issued a notice to appear in immigration court, and is currently detained at the Howard County Detention Center in Jessup, Maryland,” ICE said in a statement, quoted by WUSA-TV.

Attorney Himedes Chicas told reporters that Sanchez-Reyes surrendered peacefully. No court date has been set as of yet.

Sanchez-Reyes is the father of Henry E. Sanchez-Milian, one of two suspects in the recent rape of a female student at Rockville High School that brought the issue of criminal acts committed by illegal immigrants into the national spotlight. The other suspect was identified as Jose Montano, 17.

Idaho Freshmen announce formation of Idaho Freedom Caucus

From the LMT: 

Reps. Mike Kingsley and Bryan Zollinger say they feel conservative message is going unheard

Two freshmen representatives looking for a productive way to advance conservative ideals announced the formation of an Idaho House Freedom Caucus on Monday.

Reps. Mike Kingsley, R-Lewiston, and Bryan Zollinger, R-Idaho Falls, will be co-chairmen of the group. They expect to have at least 10 members initially, but 24 showed up to a late-afternoon informational meeting.

The proposal to create a conservative caucus comes at the tail end of a session that’s been marked by frequent conflicts and procedural disputes between House Republican leaders and a group of far-right lawmakers that includes Reps. Heather Scott, R-Blanchard, Ron Nate, R-Rexburg, and Priscilla Giddings, R-White Bird.

Kingsley said the Scott-Nate group has some good ideas, but they’ve undermined their own efforts by directly challenging the established leadership hierarchy.

“We feel like the conservative message isn’t getting out,” he said. “Some walls have been built, some barriers. We need to come together as a group to get our message into meaningful bills.”

The caucus is modeled in part on the congressional House Freedom Caucus, which made a name for itself by ousting House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio, in 2015. The group also played a role in blocking the Obamacare repeal-and-replace bill last week.

“We love what they’re doing in D.C. with their Freedom Caucus,” Kingsley said. “They’re having an impact.”

Zollinger, however, suggested the Idaho House Freedom Caucus will be a kinder, gentler version of its congressional counterpart.

Schumer Loses It: Screams at a Trump Supporter in a NY Restaurant

That according to witnesses at the restaurant. Too bad no one posted the video yet from their cell phones. 

Schumer Looses It: Screams at a Trump Supporter in a Restaurant

If you didn’t think that this year’s politics could get any more divisive (or weird), think again. According to a report from Page Six, things turned ugly on Sunday night when a pleasant conversation erupted into a brawl in a Manhattan Restaurant.

Judicial Watch Sues EPA for “Environmental Justice” Grant Records

Judicial Watch sues EPA over ‘environmental justice’ program

Judicial Watch is taking the Environmental Protection Agency to court in an effort to pry loose information about several environmental justice grants doled out by the agency. The watchdog group is seeking copies of the EPA’s proposals and awards for environmental justice grants delivered in 2014 and 2015, and said it hasn’t been provided with any documents yet.

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“This is a simple records request and the fact that the Obama EPA ignored it for years tells you the agency has something to hide,” Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton said in a press release.

The environmental justice program seeks to measure the environmental impact of industry and development as it relates to minority populations, but conservatives have complained that the effort funds progressive groups that are only interested in slowing down any development at all through lawsuits and rulemaking.

For the watchdog group, it’s another opportunity for the new administration to provide greater transparency by legally releasing older information that was held back in FOIA requests by the Obama administration. But those hopes haven’t been met so far.

The team at Judicial Watch would like to...follow the money.

“The Obama EPA’s ‘environmental justice’ slush fund for its leftwing allies needs to be exposed,” said Judicial Watch President Tom Fitton. “This is a simple records request and the fact that the Obama EPA ignored it for years tells you the agency has something to hide.”

Flashback: Kaine Is For Using ‘Nuclear Option’ For SC Nominees

But he was only for the Democrats using the nuclear option against the Republicans, not the other way around.

“If these guys think they’re going to stonewall the filling of that vacancy or other vacancies, then a Democratic Senate majority will say, ‘we’re not going to let you thwart the law.  And so we will change the Senate rules to uphold the law, that the court will be nine members,” Sen. Tim Kaine said to the Huffington Post in October of 2016.

Of course back when he said that, Kaine was a vice-presidential candidate on the ticket with Hillary Clinton, who would have nominated the appointees if she had won the election.

Kaine claimed it was very important to have a Supreme Court with nine sitting justices.

“And the battle is, do we want a lawfully constituted full court or will we let the Republicans have a hobbled limited and weakened court?” Kaine said.

“And this really is unprecedented, and the thing that’s unprecedented about it is this, the Senate has to advise and consent. That doesn’t mean you have to vote ‘yes’, you can vote ‘no’. It’s not a rubber stamp. What these guys are doing is, ‘wait a minute we don’t have to vote yes or no’ – and maybe we can trick our voters into not holding us accountable for not voting yes or no.’”

This “trick” was something Kaine said senators would stop.

“Well the voters are going to stop them or we are going to stop them. And when I say we, I am a U.S. Senator and I’m going to be a U.S. Senator through the end of the year and maybe beyond. But I am a U.S. Senator.”

“I have a prediction, this is not a guarantee and I’m not revealing inside intel, but I was in the Senate when the Republicans stonewalling around appointments caused Senate Democratic majority to switch the vote threshold on appointments, from 60 to 51. And we did it on everything but a Supreme Court justice,” Kaine said.  

“If these guys think they’re going to stonewall the filling of that vacancy or other vacancies, then a Democratic Senate majority will say, ‘we’re not going to let you thwart the law’.  And so we will change the Senate rules to uphold the law, that the court will be nine members.”

“So it sounds like you’re predicting, Harry (Reid) will follow through in what has been so far sort of a subtle, veiled, threat to change the filibuster rules for the Supreme Court,” the host said.

“I am predicting that if the Republicans continue to stonewall, then I think that will happen. Again, I’m not revealing inside intel this is a prediction,” Kaine said.

Trump eyes politicized climate, energy budgets

NewImage

Trimming the climate fat and refocusing on authroized agency missions

The Trump Administration is taking a cool fiscal position on feverish global warming alarm-driven regulatory agendas. Politicized EPA, NASA, NOAA, and DOE programs will be targeted for special discipline.

Three major focus areas: 

  1. EPA Overreach
  2. NASA’s priorities being space
  3. NOAA’s climate research

Sun’s impact on climate change quantified for first time

This new-news is old-news. Scientists have known for centuries that the sun is the major force behind the earth’s temperature. 

Sun’s impact on climate change quantified for first time

For the first time, model calculations show a plausible way that fluctuations in solar activity could have a tangible impact on the climate. Studies funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation expect human-induced global …

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For the first time, model calculations show a plausible way that fluctuations in solar activity could have a tangible impact on the climate, reports Phys.org.

Studies funded by the Swiss National Science Foundation expect human-induced global warming to tail off slightly over the next few decades. A weaker sun could reduce temperatures by half a degree.

There is human-induced climate change, and there are natural climate fluctuations. One important factor in the unchanging rise and fall of the Earth’s temperature and its different cycles is the sun. As its activity varies, so does the intensity of the sunlight that reaches us.

One of the key questions facing climate researchers is whether these fluctuations have any effect at all on the Earth’s climate. IPCC reports assume that recent solar activity is insignificant for climate change, and that the same will apply to activity in the near future.

Researchers from the Physical Meteorological Observatory Davos (PMOD), the Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology (EAWAG), ETH Zurich and the University of Bern are now qualifying this assumption. Their elaborate model calculations are supplying a robust estimate of the contribution that the sun is expected to make to temperature change in the next 100 years.

For the first time, a significant effect is apparent. They expect the Earth’s temperature to fall by half a degree when solar activity reaches its next minimum. According to project head Werner Schmutz, who is also Director of PMOD, this reduction in temperature is significant, even though it will do little to compensate for human-induced climate change. “We could win valuable time if solar activity declines and slows the pace of global warming a little. That might help us to deal with the consequences of climate change.”

But this will be no more than borrowed time, warns Schmutz, since the next minimum will inevitably be followed by a maximum.

Strong fluctuations could explain past climate