Best and worst states for retirement

Idaho is #3 best state! No surprise there. 

Best and worst states for retirement

While many Americans already have plenty of worries when it comes to retirement – whether it be their personal financial well-being or the uncertainty of Social Security’s future – location sometimes get overlooked when it could be key.

Here are the best and worst states to retire, according to Bankrate.com. Do you notice a pattern? 

1.            South Dakota

2.            Utah

3.            Idaho

4.            New Hampshire

5.            Florida

6.            Montana

7.            North Carolina

8.            Wyoming

9.            Nebraska

10.         Mississippi

11.         Hawaii

12.         Massachusetts

13.         Virginia

14.         Michigan

15.         Missouri

16.         Iowa

17.         Colorado

18.         Texas

19.         Delaware

20.         North Dakota

21.         Tennessee

22.         Maine

23.         Indiana

24.         Alabama

25.         Kansas

26.         Vermont

27.         Wisconsin

28.         Minnesota

29.         Arizona

30.         Kentucky

31.         Pennsylvania

32.         New Jersey

33.         West Virginia

34.         Rhode Island

35.         Connecticut

36.         Alaska

37.         Georgia

38.         Ohio

39.         Oregon

40.         Oklahoma

41.         South Carolina

42.         Nevada

43.         Washington

44.         Illinois

45.         California

46.         Arkansas

47.         Louisiana

48.         Maryland

49.         New Mexico

50.         New York

America likely to be top producer of oil by 2019

Saudi America. This is a great thing, regardless of what the greenies say. The US should not be dependent on the rest of the world for our energy needs. 

Via the AP: 

The United States has nosed ahead of Saudi Arabia and is on pace to surpass Russia to become the world’s biggest oil producer for the first time in more than four decades.

The latest forecast from the U.S. Energy Information Administration predicts that U.S. output will grow next year to 11.8 million barrels a day.

“If the forecast holds, that would make the U.S. the world’s leading producer of crude,” said Linda Capuano, who heads the agency, a part of the Energy Department.

Saudi Arabia and Russia could upend that forecast by boosting their own production. In the face of rising global oil prices, members of the OPEC cartel and a few non-members including Russia agreed last month to ease production caps that had contributed to the run-up in prices.

President Donald Trump has urged the Saudis to pump more oil to contain rising prices. He tweeted June 30 that King Salman agreed to boost production “maybe up to 2,000,000 barrels.” The White House later clarified that the king said his country has a reserve of 2 million barrels a day that could be tapped “if and when necessary.”

The idea that the U.S. could ever again become the world’s top oil producer once seemed preposterous.

“A decade ago the only question was how fast would U.S. production go down,” said Daniel Yergin, author of several books about the oil industry including a history, “The Prize.” The rebound of U.S. output “has made a huge difference. If this had not happened, we would have had a severe shortage of world oil,” he said.

The United States led the world in oil production for much of the 20th century, but the Soviet Union surpassed America in 1974, and Saudi Arabia did the same in 1976, according to Energy Department figures.

By the end of the 1970s the USSR was producing one-third more oil than the U.S.; by the end of the 1980s, Soviet output was nearly double that of the U.S.

CO2 Emissions Lowest in Seven Decades In Trump’s America

All of Obama’s problems were Bush’s fault. 

All of Trump’s successes were actually Obama’s. 

Uh-huh. 

“But, according to the  latest energy report from The Energy Information Administration (EIA)under President Trump, per-capita carbon dioxide emissions are now the lowest they’ve been in nearly seven decades.”

Even more interesting is the fact that US carbon emissions dropped while emissions from energy consumption for the rest of the world increased by 1.6%, after little or no growth for the three years from 2014 to 2016.

Via WUWT

Inconvenient: NOAA data shows U.S. Tornadoes on the decline since 1970

Oops. 

Now we know that global warming causes fewer tornadoes. 

Bad global warming! 

We’ve been told time and again by climate alarmists that global warming would make more severe weather. In fact, the opposite is true according to recently released tornado data from NOAA’s Storm Prediction Center.

By Paul Homewood

https://i2.wp.com/www.spc.noaa.gov/wcm/2017/torngraph-big.png?w=1000&ssl=1

https://www.spc.noaa.gov/wcm/2017/torngraph-big.png

2017 was a relatively busy year for tornadoes in the US, ranking third since 2005 on preliminary data.

This was mainly due to a spurt in numbers in January to March, most of which were weak EF-0 and EF-1 tornadoes. There were though three EF-3s in an outbreak in January, which sadly led to 20 fatalities.

https://i2.wp.com/www.spc.noaa.gov/wcm/2017/ptorngraph-big.png?resize=1000%2C619&ssl=1

https://www.spc.noaa.gov/wcm/2017/ptorngraph-big.png

Via WUWT

Josh on Mann-made warming

NewImage

The comic is making fun of known weather station locations. 

For people who don’t believe this, or think we are just “making stuff up”…here’s the official weather station at the airport in Rome, Italy. I wonder if the Pope has seen this?

And here’s an official NOAA weather station on a rooftop in Santa Ana, CA

Via WUWT

1937-2017: “THE SUPREME COURT IS A NOBLE BODY THAT SACREDLY BREATHES OUT THE DIVINE WORD OF LAW” 2018- : “The Supreme Court is overly partisan and is becoming a capricious mob of political activists in black robes that legislates by judicial fiat and needs to be checked.”

1937-2017: “THE SUPREME COURT IS A NOBLE BODY THAT SACREDLY BREATHES OUT THE DIVINE WORD OF LAW”

2018- : “The Supreme Court is overly partisan and is becoming a capricious mob of political activists in black robes that legislates by judicial fiat and needs to be checked.”

When they lose the White House, we must change the electoral college. When they lose the Supreme Court, we must change the number of justices. When they win one congressional seat (from themselves), the people have spoken and we must change our entire economy to socialism.

When they lose the White House, we must change the electoral college.

When they lose the Supreme Court, we must change the number of justices.

When they win one congressional seat (from themselves), the people have spoken and we must change our entire economy to socialism.

Quote of the Day: Trump substituts presidential whims for clear and fixed rules, just like Obama

NewImageFrom the Wall Street Journal editorial board:

One reason the economy struggled under Barack Obama is because he stretched the law to serve his ideology. Businesses never knew when a new regulation might hit next, and on what legal basis. Mr. Trump is making the same mistake on trade, substituting presidential whim for clear and fixed rules.

If Mr. Trump invents a national-security threat to justify car tariffs, business should fight back in court and Congress should strip his Section 232 power.

City of Moscow Receives Bids for Third Street Multi-Modal Bridge Project

Via KQQQ

The City of Moscow has received two bids on the Third Street Bridge Project.  The project’s design engineers Keller Associates, had given the city an Engineer’s Estimate of $598,906, plus a 15% construction contingency of almost $90,000.  The low bid of $920,957 was submitted by Clearwater Construction and Management Company, of Spokane.  The second lowest bid was from NNAC Construction of Coeur d’ Alene, for between $976,000 and $977, 0000 dollars, depending on the schedule.

Moscow Public Works Director Les MacDonald will be presenting the bids at the Moscow City Council Meeting on July 16th. MacDonald is expected to recommend that the City Council reject all bids and discussing options with the Council.

Mayor Bill Lambert said, “In the current economic climate, we have seen the costs of construction skyrocket. Despite our disappointment with these high bids, the Third Street Bridge Project and the multi-modal improvements to the Third Street transportation corridor are still a high priority and a goal of the City Council. It is my hope that re-bidding outside of the current construction season will allow us to obtain favorable bids.”