Police: Canada’s viral “hate crime” against Muslim school girl never happened

Politicians are too eager to jump on the accusation bandwagon. 

And they have nothing to lose. If it turns out to be false, everyone will forget about it and move along to the next accusation. 

A racially-motivated attack in which a schoolgirl claimed a man tried to cut off her hijab has turned out to be a hoax, Toronto police concluded.
Quelle surprise.

On January 12, an 11-year-old Canadian Muslim girl reported that a man tried to cut off her hijab with scissors as she walked to school with her brother. The story swept the nation with widespread attention on traditional and social media.

It even prompted Prime Minister Justin Trudeau to tweet an official statement:

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The mayor of Toronto, John Tory, also commented about the incident on Twitter:

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Via AOS

For MLK Day: Thomas Sowell reflects on the legacy of Rev. King and his famous speech

NewImageThomas Sowell offered some reflections on MLK’s legacy and the significance of his famous speech in a National Review article titled “A Poignant Anniversary.” 

At the core of Dr. King’s speech was his dream of a world in which people would not be judged by the color of their skin, but by “the content of their character.” Judging individuals by their individual character is at the opposite pole from judging how groups are statistically represented among employees, college students, or political figures. Yet many — if not most — of those who celebrate the “I have a dream” speech today promote the directly opposite approach of group preferences, especially those based on skin color.

What was historic about that speech was not only what was said but how powerfully its message resonated among Americans of that time across the spectrum of race, ideology, and politics. A higher percentage of Republicans than Democrats voted in Congress for both the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

To say that that was a hopeful time would be an understatement. To say that many of those hopes have since been disappointed would also be an understatement. There has been much documented racial progress since 1963. But there has also been much retrogression, of which the disintegration of the black family has been central, especially among those at the bottom of the social pyramid. Many people — especially politicians and activists — want to take credit for the economic and other advancement of blacks, even though a larger proportion of blacks rose out of poverty in the 20 years before 1960 than in the 20 years afterwards. But no one wants to take responsibility for the policies and ideologies that led to the breakup of the black family, which had survived centuries of slavery and generations of discrimination.

Many hopes were disappointed because those were unrealistic hopes to begin with. Economic and other disparities between groups have been common for centuries, in countries around the world — and many of those disparities have been, and still are, larger than the disparities between blacks and whites in America. Even when those who lagged behind have advanced, they have not always caught up, even after centuries, because others were advancing at the same time. But when blacks did not catch up with whites in America within a matter of decades, that was treated as strange — or even a sinister sign of crafty and covert racism.

Civil rights were necessary, but far from sufficient. Education and job skills are crucial, and the government cannot give you these things. All it can do is make them available. Race hustlers who blame all lags on the racism of others are among the obstacles to taking the fullest advantage of education and other opportunities. What does that say about the content of their character?

When the Civil Rights Act of 1964…. passed, it provoked no rethinking. Instead, it provoked all sorts of new demands. Judging everybody by the same standards came to be regarded in some quarters as “racist” because it precluded preferences and quotas. There are people today who talk “justice” when they really mean payback — including payback against people who were not even born when historic injustices were committed.